Corrugated Fiberboard – Micro-flute

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Corrugated fiberboard, also known as micro-flute, consists of a fluted corrugated sheet and one or two flat linerboards. It is available in different wall thicknesses, known as flute sizes. All sizes have the option of a laminated printed top sheet.

  • Recycled Fiber Made from 100% recycled material.
  • Consistency Excellent: roll-to-roll consistency.
  • Food Contact meets multiple national requirements for food contact packaging, e.g., US & Canada.

C-Flute – 3/16 inch thick

3500 – 3700 microns (3.5mm – 3.7mm) in thickness offers greater compression strength than ‘B’ flute, thus giving slightly better stacking strength for lighter products. C-flute is the most widely used flute size and is commonly used for shipping cases. Highly acceptable printing properties with a laminated printed top sheet.

B-Flute – 1/8 inch thick

2700 – 2900 microns (2.7mm – 2.9mm) in thickness and probably the most common type of fluting. Developed for packaging canned goods, B-flute is preferred for high-speed automatic packing lines, as well as many other forms of inner packing. B-flute is sed in all types of applications, including die-cut and flatter surface for higher quality printing with a laminated printed top sheet.

E-Flute – 1/16 inch thick

1100 – 1200 microns (1.1mm – 1.2mm) in thickness and gives excellent crush resistance and compression strength. It provides a high-quality surface to print upon and is most commonly used in smaller cartons and die-cuts applications. A robust alternative to paperboard folding cartons.

F-Flute – 1/32 inch thick

1100 – 1200 microns (0.8mm – 1.0mm) in thickness and was developed for small retail packaging. Its lower fiber content creates a more rigid box with less solid waste going into landfills. Often used for specialty packaging and fast food clamshell packaging.

For more information on our Corrugated Fiberboard, or if you have questions about our other products, please feel free to give us a call today.


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